How to Design a Tie

February 19, 2009

Now that my neckwear collection has officially hit the floor at Bergdorf Goodman, several people have asked me about my design process.  I hope the below images and explanation of my Doctor T.J. Eckleburg tie from my Spring 2009 collection will help!

book-gatsby_1925_jacketThe inspiration for this tie began with Doctor T.J. Eckleburg’s all seeing eyes.  The sign from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” was the start!  The book which was written in the 1920’s mentioned the dilapidated sign which was most likely a trade sign that had been left over from the Victorian Era.  I began to research Victorian optometrist signs.  Here is what I found:

pincenez

I also liked the idea of having a chain on the glasses. They would have properly been worn in the Victorian Era with a chain pinned to the lapel of your jacket.  I began to research old cabinet cards to find an example.

pincenezcabinetcardNext, I created a CAD in Adobe Illustrator making sure that the chain wrapped around to the back of the tie as though it was pinned on.  I handed the CAD off to my weaving mill in England:

7Next, my mill came back to me with a first submit for comments:

trial-1

Comments are made and the corrections are made to the pattern through weaving.  Here is the second submit:

black-glasses

I still thought that this was missing a pop of color, so we added blue to the center of the eye.  At this point, I began working with my factory to develop a marker to get minimum wastage when cutting this pattern.  As you can see on the sample yardage below, we had to work on the placement of the motif because they were too close together.

marker

Once the yardage is woven perfectly it is cut, folded, and sewn by hand in our union shop in New York City.

David Hart & Co. ties being made by hand in our union shop in New York City

David Hart & Co. ties being made by hand in our union shop in New York City

Here is the finished product ready to ship!:

finished-tie

Related Posts:
David Hart & Co. Ties Available at Bergdorf Goodman

5 Responses to “How to Design a Tie”

  1. Fashion Robot said

    So interesting, thank you for sharing with your loyal readers!

    This post is more exciting than anything I have seen at New York fashion week. Industry seems to be in a creative slump…..way too many celebrity lines and not enough craftsmanship or ingenuity!

  2. Fascinating! I had no idea how ties were produced. And now that I’ve seen this I must have that tie. Beautiful.

  3. […] Could you talk to us a little bit about how you go into the design process? We read a page on your blog about how you design a tie, but could you just walk us through it for the […]

  4. […] Could you talk to us a little bit about how you go into the design process? We read a page on your blog about how you design a tie, but could you just walk us through it for the […]

  5. Brent said

    Thank you for showing us this process. What a cool tie! I was a suit salesman for a few years, and it was always so difficult to find information about ties, and I always yearned to tell stories about everything we sold.

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